Poverty and its relationship to complexity? 2018-10-11T09:13:01+00:00

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  • Stewart GebbieStewart Gebbie
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    A little while ago I wrote a short opinion piece regarding Poverty and Complexity: Is Poverty a Complexity Problem?

    In this I discuss the possibility there might be value in reconsidering poverty as a complexity problem rather than as a financial or even a resource problem. That is, that we could possibly put forward a stronger and more workable definition of poverty by relating the state of poverty in a social system to concepts of complex systems.

    While I have been following content from Complexity Labs for a while now, I have only recently joint the forum. Given that, I am interested in hearing feedback that members might have regarding the ideas of considering poverty as a complexity problem.

    Thanks,
    Stewart.

    • This topic was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by Stewart Gebbie Stewart Gebbie. Reason: grammar
    Joss ColchesterJoss Colchester
    Keymaster
    Post count: 42

    Good question, my first impression is just the fact that poverty is such a broad category, there are many different kinds and ways of thinking about it, for example the poverty of a developing nation is quite different to that of a developed economy. I think as always the complexity approach would look at the context within which it exists rather than focusing on the specific issue itself to understand how broader social and environmental factors shape poverty, looking at it as a systemic issue. For example is it maintained by inequality within the society, inequality can be understood in terns of feedback loops and the rich get richer effect which works to perpetuation property. Have you read the book “Aid on the Edge of Chaos” that applies complexity to international development: http://bit.ly/2OiUUAN

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